24 Jun

Springboks v All Blacks, Durban, 23 June 2007
by Tracey Nelson
24 Jun 2007

The usual analysis of the All Blacks’ game, being the First 3 to the Breakdown, tackle stats, penalties conceded, turnovers, the lineouts, and scrums.

Please note Completed Tackles means that player actually brought the ball carrier to ground (ie. snuffing out the movement), not assists in the tackle situation which are tallied separately. Missed tackles also includes slipped tackles where the ball runner gets away. Most importantly, I do NOT call a slipped tackle a tackle, it gets noted as a missed tackle.

Numbers in brackets are the first half/second half breakdown for each total. An asterisk denotes a player that came on as a substitute.

Team: Muliaina, Rokocoko, Toeava, Sivivatu, Mauger, Carter, Kelleher, So’oialo, McCaw (c), Collins, Rawlinson, Flavell, Hayman, Oliver, Woodcock. Res – MacDonald, McAlister, Weepu, Masoe, Filipo, Tialata, Mealamu.

Filipo replaced Rawlinson after 47 minutes, McAlister replaced Mauger after 66 minutes, Weepu replaced Kelleher and MacDonald replaced Muliaina after 69 minutes

Point Scoring
NZ 26 2 tries, 2 conversions, 3 penalties, 1 drop goal
SA 21 2 tries, 1 conversion, 3 penalties
Penalties/Free Kicks conceded
11 penalties and 2 free kick in the game
NZ 4 penalties and 1 free kick
SA 7 penalties and 1 free kick

NZ’s penalty offences:
Tackle (not releasing ball) = 1 (Muliaina)
Offside entry at ruck = 2 (Flavell, Mealamu)
Lineout (pulling player in air) = 1 (Flavell)

1 Free kick awarded against NZ for too many players in lineout.

South Africa’s penalty offences:
Offside (general) = 1
Tackle = 2
Ruck = 3
Punching = 1

1 Free kick awarded against SA at scrum.

Turnovers conceded by NZ
20 (14 knock-ons, 1 intercept, 3 tackle turnovers, 1 R/M turnover, 1 accidental offside)
First 3 to Breakdown
Flavell 37 (20+17)
McCaw 37 (19+18)
So’oialo 32 (21+11)
Hayman 29 (14+15)
Woodcock 27 (16+11)
Filipo* 19
Collins 19 (12+7)
Rawlinson 15 (13+2)
Oliver 115 (12+3)
Mauger 11 (8+3)
Carter 9 (6+3)
Rokocoko 9 (6+3)
Sivivatu 8 (5+3)
Toeava 7 (4+3)
Kelleher 6 (3+3)
Muliaina 5 (2+3)
Mealamu* 3
Weepu* 2
McAlister* 1
Completed Tackles (76) and Assists (22)
McCaw 15 (8+7) and 1 (0+1)
Kelleher 7 (5+2) and 0
Collins 6 (3+3) and 5 (2+3)
Carter 6 (3+3) and 2 (1+1)
So’oialo 6 (3+3) and 1 (0+1)
Mauger 5 (3+2) and 2 (0+2)
Flavell 4 (3+1) and 2
(1+1)
Hayman 4 (2+2) and 2 (1+1)
Rokocoko 4 (2+2) and 1 (0+1)
Toeava 4 (2+2) and 1 (0+1)
Rawlinson 3 (3+0) and 0
Oliver 3 (2+1) and 1 (1+0)
Woodcock 3 (3+0) and 0
Sivivatu 3 (1+2) and 0
Filipo* 1 and 1
McAlister* 1 and 0
McCaw* 1 and 2
Muliaina 1(1+0) and 1 (1+0)
Missed and slipped tackles (2)
Sivivatu 1
So’oialo 1
NZ Lineouts
A total of 18 in the game
First half
NZ 6/8
Second half
NZ 9/10

So’oialo = 5/6
Flavell = 2/3
Rawlinson = 1/2
Filipo = 1/1
Collins = 1/1
Quick throws = 5

SA had 11 throws to their lineout, won 10 and lost 1. The All Blacks contested 6 of the 11 Springbok throws.

Scrums
A total of 16 in the game, with 8 resets
First half (7)
NZ 1/1
SA 5/6
Second half (9)
NZ 3/3
SA 5/6
24 Jun

One Out Of The Boks
by Paul Waite
24 Jun 2007

I thoroughly enjoyed the last 15 minutes of this test, the other 65 being a frustrating affair punctuated by a lot of shouting at the telly.

But despite the All Blacks being down to more or less the bottom of the barrel in locks, and having lugged themselves across the World to Durban, and being stuck with only six days to prepare, and lacking the kind of introduction to 3N test standard that the Boks themselves had last week, and being away from home, and Carter having an off day with his kicking (deep breath)… despite all that they won!

When you take all the despites into consideration it was a huge win.

There was a lot of rustiness evident, and Graham Henry’s assessment after the game, that the team can improve 40% on that seems about right.

The gaps did come right in that final 15 minutes, but the Springboks started to drop off the pace much earlier than that. Most of it may have been the difference in fitness level from the conditioning, as mentioned by the commentators at the time, but I think you might also factor in the effort that the Boks had to put in to contain the All Blacks throughout that first 65 minutes. They knew they had to put a lot of pressure on right across the park, and they did, throwing 3-4 players at every contest for the ball. It was the kind of effort you often see when a team has a player in the sin-bin for 10 minutes, but they were attempting to do it for the full 80 minutes. In the end I think that high work rate might have cost them as well.

In the first half the All Blacks were guilty of not looking after the ball enough, both in possession, and also cleaning out. The rustiness showed itself in all those silly dropped balls, and fumbles at critical times, which stopped the team dead when things looked promising. It took the players all first half and some of the second to once again get used to the lack of time you have at this level.

There were some big games out there. Byron Kelleher was on full noise and put everything into it. Collins likewise was back to his destructive best, pummelling the Bok defence with some characteristic charging runs and putting in some very hard hits on defence. Rodney So’oialo made the odd mistake, but overall was fabulous – the highlight being a weaving, stepping run past 3-4 players. The front row had the Boks in their sights from the start and only got more dominant. Carl Hayman was everywhere as usual. Richie McCaw likewise into anything and everything.

Out in the backs it was hard to judge too much in this test where it was scrappy and ugly and tight. Everyone acquitted themselves well. The spotlight was on Toeava, with everyone interested to see how he fared at this level with an eye to World Cup performance. He had a solid game and a good learning experience to take forward to face the trickier work that the Wallabies will throw at the team out wide. He also benefited from having the experienced Aaron Mauger alongside him. Despite tossing the ball up for a Butch James intercept try, Mauger also had a good game overall. His vision and kicking skills kept the All Blacks on the front foot at crucial times.

The scrum was very solid, and grew in dominance as the game wore on. With Troy Flavell and Rawlinson locking the All Blacks were (with all due respect) using a third-tier pairing in the lineout. Initial throws to Flavell going up against Matfield proved costly as the latter outplayed his opposite, but as the game progressed the All Blacks managed to deliver solid ball by mixing things up and using the likes of So’oialo to avoid that contest.

It was nice to see the quality of the All Blacks bench too. Every sub came on and made a difference as the Boks tired and gaps appeared. MacDonald, McAlister and Keven Mealamu especially.

Looking back on this test, the All Blacks looked the better team in terms of overall capacity right from the kickoff, but they also looked out of sorts and couldn’t get their game rolling. For 65 minutes it appeared as if the Boks would take the glory, but the cost of their efforts finally caught up with them and they faded in the face of an All Black team which was getting stronger.

What this test means in terms of the World Cup is hard to say. Both teams are just getting back into international rugby, and will improve. Both teams have injured players to come back in.

But one can’t avoid thinking that the All Blacks have more improvement in them than the Boks do in terms of bringing the full gamut of their game together.

The issue of the apparent gap in fitness level might also be sending out a warning message to the other top international sides. It’s a while since we have seen this factor in a test match. Just how significant it is will only become evident after the end of the Tri-Nations.

Congratulations to Graham Henry, Steve Hansen, Wayne Smith, Brian Lochore and the All Blacks. A win against the Springboks in South Africa still has a wonderful taste to it!

Paul Waite

Paul Waite

Haka editor-in-chief. Please do not feed.

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23 Jun

Crunching the Numbers – Interview with the All Blacks' Analyst
by Tracey Nelson
23 Jun 2007

Andrew Sullivan is the All Blacks’ Technical (Video) Analyst and rejoined the All Blacks prior to the 2006 season after a previous stint as the team analyst in 2002–2003. He has also been the Crusaders and Canterbury video analyst and IT co-ordinator since 2001. I caught up with him prior to the All Blacks’ Tri-Nations test against the Springboks in Christchurch to find out a little more about the role of a rugby Technical Analyst.

How has game analysis evolved in the last few years?Are we at the point where there are no surprises left on the field?

At the end of the day the game of rugby won’t change, and the different systems around the world all achieve the same results. They’ve got the ability to recall any bit of footage that’s coded, basically. The joy of what we in NZ use is that it’s coded in great detail and we can pull anything out since 1999 and the template hasn’t changed much in that time for New Zealand.

Does having the ANZC, Super 14 and All Blacks all using the same system give us an advantage over some other rugby nations?

Absolutely. You can’t cross between the different systems and it was the foresight of the NZRU in 1999 to do it nationwide. They subsidise it through the high performance units across the franchises and the ANZC teams.

How have relationships with South Africa changed over the years?

It’s changed remarkably. When I started with Super 12 in 2002 I didn’t know any of the other analysts. It wasn’t until a few years ago that we started to break down those barriers and it certainly makes the job a lot easier. With the South African Super 14 teams and The Force using the same system, we’ve got the ability to use the same footage, so instead of two analysts duplicating and doing the same job twice it makes sense to work together and farm the footage so we can share. Coaches have broken down those barriers in the six years I’ve been involved, and you can see the benefits of doing that because in 2002 there was no sharing and we weren’t allowed to talk to anyone which just made your job so much harder.But the other side of that is the broadcaster in South Africa (Super Sport) and the broadcaster in New Zealand (SKY) – they understand what we’re trying to achieve and basically open their doors and help us work what we can.We’re lucky, because SKY is so good.Because Australia is league and AFL oriented, their camera men have that kind of background, and their producers/directors change their interpretations and the camera angles change.

What is the role of the Analyst on game day?

Game day starts at about 2pm, setting up and getting ready to go to the ground at 5pm for a 7.30pm game. For the All Blacks I travel in an advance party of four about two and a half hours before the game, get to the ground and set up about three laptops in the TV truck.

We record an Angle Cam which is side-on wide and Camera 2 which is side-on close-up – which are the ones you mainly see on TV and give us the most information. We also record an end-on view which is a close feed as well, you’ll see that quite often. It’s not the same end-on they use for the TMO decisions, it’s an elevated view so we can see depth. We also record our own end-on which is wide, so we can see at least half the field at a time. With the All Blacks we also do reverse-angle scrums, we’ve got a chap just doing scrums and at half time he’ll come down and give the camera to one of our support staff who will take it across to our scrum coach (Mike Cron). He reviews it so he can talk to our front row at half time.

And once the game has kicked off?

During the game I sit with the coaches. Live there is always a delayed feed so we have a TV which plays live but also a laptop with a time-warp attached to that delaying the feed by about 20 seconds. The coach will watch play on the field and we can also watch it 20 seconds later on the laptop. So he can see the replays on the live TV, but also catch the replays again 20 seconds later on the laptop. Sometimes we stream live up to the coaches’ box so they’ll have another laptop that has an end-on live view so they can see that section as well.

I also code lines so that if the coach says I want to see that scrum from 10 minutes ago I can click a button and he can watch a move, or breach, or try, or whatever.I’ve got the referee’s microphone in my ear so I’m filtering out the stuff the coaches don’t need to hear, and relaying calls.You can quite often pick up the lineout calls from us and the opposition.

What happens after the game?

After the game it’s just a matter of collecting all the footage – so walking around with a stack of laptops. That’s just got one file of the whole game, normally about two and half hours long, and what we do is extract out the halves to save disc space and bring it back to the hotel.From there it’s replicated across the coaches’ laptops, players’ laptops and analysis laptops, then we wait for the code from Verusco to come through usually about 3 or 4am.

Verusco are based in Palmerston North and have 6 to 8 people normally coding a game which takes about 36 man-hours, but they have their best people working for the All Blacks so it only takes 3-4 hours, or sometimes up to 5. For a Super 14 game it’s 6 hours, but of course with the Super 14 there are seven games a weekend so with three games on a Saturday night if you’re playing last then you get your code last, sometimes not till the Sunday night. There’s no preferential treatment for the New Zealand teams because South Africa and The Force take the code as well – so there’s no favoritism.

Verusco record their own footage and then code it on their clip, so when they send their file through to me I have different footage so I have to line every view up with their codes – which is just a matter of going through check points every five plays and saying that’s where the play starts. It’s four or five views, sometimes six. It’s not hard, just time consuming and then you have to replicate it across the various laptops. Saturday night through to Monday morning is my busiest time and it’s pretty common to do 11 or 12 hour days at that stage of the week.

That’s quite a workload under what I imagine would be very time-driven pressure, so what drives you in your job?

I do. I push myself.I have pretty high standards and I hate letting people down.It’s one of my bug bears.

Is the information you gather the same for both the Super 14 and the All Blacks?

The information used varies greatly between the Crusaders and the All Blacks, because each coach and team have different tasks they measure for outcomes, and different KPIs (Key Performance Indicators). So for the Crusaders I’ve got an access database that I import the raw lines of code from Verusco and manipulate it into lines of information that mean something to our players and coaches. With the All Blacks it’s the same situation but different information.So while the KPIs are totally different, the way I get the information is the same.

How do the All Black team prepare for a game?

On a Monday we do a Preview/Need to Know session so the guys know what the focus is for the week. Steve (Hansen) briefs us on the Monday normally. We’ve got the ability through the Verusco system to extract clips for them, and little clipets of play and we can string those all together and show those at the debrief. They’re also available on the players’ laptops for players to go over in greater detail. Tuesday is defence, so Graham reviews our past defensive records and also looks at the next opposition and how they’re going to attack us. Wednesday is attack, specifically on how we’re going to play.

What do the players get to see when they come to the laptops?

It’s up to the individual. They know the game is coded in great detail – with 36 man hours it’s not just a tackle, it’s a left shoulder tackle and there are 10 different qualities of a tackle from the turnover to the hit. They know it’s all coded so they can click on a number and it will show them everything that’s been coded for. Or they can go and look up their tackles, or just their breaches, our lineouts, or the opposition lineouts. They can extract anything they like.

So how much time would players spend looking over their own game?

Surprisingly little, because they can do it so easily that in a matter of 10 minutes you’ve viewed all of your tackles. Take Richie for example, if he’s made 10 tackles he’ll take a couple of minutes over each one. Probably they spend a half hour to an hour a couple of times a week. Plus they’ll also go with the specialist coaches, like for lineouts and scrums etc.For example, before the Bok test in Christchurch the scrum coach went throughout the Super 14 and internationals extracting their scrummaging traits – so he’ll go through those traits with the applicable players who are playing that weekend.

Comparing coaches, who spends the most time going through game footage – Robbie Deans or Graham Henry?

It’s pretty hard as they do it behind closed doors so I don’t know 100%. With Robbie, he’s a two-man band with a couple of specialists who come in when required so he’s got to go through everything. But with Graham. he’s got not just only the team performance but he’s specifically looking at defence so he’ll go over the defence, while Wayne Smith will look over just the attack footage, and Steve Hansen does the forwards, while Mike Cron just concentrates on scrum footage.

Leading into the World Cup, how do the All Blacks go about analyzing their pool opposition.For example, Portugal and Romania are not likely to be the biggest threats but how difficult is it to analyse their play?

You can always source footage so we’ve got stuff to look at, but without knowing too much I’m sure we’ll be focusing on our own game for those pool matches. The coaches will have a wary eye on the future and what’s going on around us so we know what the other opposition teams are doing.

How will our TV feeds and linkages work in France?

Because the games are played on TV back in New Zealand, Verusco have access to the footage and they’ll do their coding so nothing changes there. But all the international teams in France will record their footage off the French feed, and everyone then has their own analysis systems and coding from there. I know the Canadians are also using Verusco now, but South Africa use ProZone, the Aussies use FairPlay etc.

Will it be business as usual as the All Blacks prepare for each game during the World Cup?

If you look at the structure of our week now, it will never change – or very rarely change. You’ve always got a debrief, a preview of how the opposition are going to play, and how we’re going to play against them. Every squad member has to prepare to play.Look at Troy Flavell this season, half an hour before a test and he’s coming on for Robbo (Keith Robinson).It’s a reminder that it can happen and the players have to be prepared.

17 Jun

All Blacks v Canada, Hamilton, 16 June 2007
by Tracey Nelson
17 Jun 2007

The usual analysis of the All Blacks’ game, being the First 3 to the Breakdown, tackle stats, penalties conceded, turnovers, the lineouts, and scrums.

Please note Completed Tackles means that player actually brought the ball carrier to ground (ie. snuffing out the movement), not assists in the tackle situation which are tallied separately. Missed tackles also includes slipped tackles where the ball runner gets away. Most importantly, I do NOT call a slipped tackle a tackle, it gets noted as a missed tackle.

Numbers in brackets are the first half/second half breakdown for each total. An asterisk denotes a player that came on as a substitute.

Team: Muliaina, Howlett, McAlister, Sivivatu, Mauger, Carter, Kelleher, Collins, Masoe, Thorne (c), Filipo, Flavell, Tialata, Hore, Schwalger. Res – MacDonald, Gear, Weepu, McCaw, So’oialo, Hayman, Mealamu.

McCaw replaced Flavell after 45 minutes, Weepu replaced Kelleher and Gear replace McAlister after 48 minutes, and MacDonald replaced Muliaina after 59 minutes.

Point Scoring
NZ 64 10 tries, 7 conversions
Canada 13 1 try, 1 conversion, 2 penalties
Penalties/Free Kicks conceded
16 penalties and 1 free kick in the game
NZ 8 penalties and 1 free kick
Canada 8 penalties

NZ’s penalty offences:
Tackle (not releasing ball) = 2 (Masoe, Schwalger)
Tackle (high) = 2 (Collins, Tialata)
Tackle (not rolling clear) = 1 (Filipo)
Offside = 1 (Sivivatu)
Playing ball on ground = 1 (Hore)
Lineout (obstruction) = 1 (Collins)

1 Free kick awarded against NZ for jumping early in lineout.

Canada’s penalty offences:
Offside (general) = 1
Tackle (not rolling clear) = 4
Ruck (hands) = 1
Ruck (entry) = 2

Turnovers conceded by NZ
NZ 11 (6 knock-ons, 2 intercepted passes, 4 tackle turnovers)
First 3 to Breakdown
Hore 32 (19+13)
Masoe 32 (17+15)
Filipo 32 (16+16)
Thorne 29 (16+13)
Tialata 24 (16+8)
Collins 23 (13+10)
McCaw* 16
Flavell 16 (16+0)
Schwalger 16 (8+8)
Carter 14 (6+8)
Muliaina 11 (9+2)
Mauger 10 (6+4)
McAlister 5 (5+0)
Howlett 4 (3+1)
MacDonald* 3
Weepu* 3
Sivivatua 3 (3+0)
Gear* 1
Completed Tackles (44) and Assists (16)
Masoe 7 (4+3) and 2 (0+2)
Hore 6 (2+4) and 0
Filipo 5 (2+3) and 1 (1+0)
Mauger 4 (1+3) and 2 (1+1)
McAlister 4 (1+3) and 1 (1+0)
Collins 3 (1+2) and 5 (1+4)
Carter 3 (1+2) and 2
(1+1)
Weepu* 3 and 0
Thorne 2 (0+2) and 2 (0+2)
Flavell 2 (1+1) and 1 (0+1)
Sivivatu 2 (1+1) and 0
Howlett 2 (1+1) and 0
Tialata 2 (0+2) and 0
Gear* 2 and 0
McCaw* 1 and 2
MacDonald* 1 and 0
Missed and slipped tackles (4)
Sivivatu 2
Thorne 1
Filipo 1
NZ Lineouts
A total of 15 in the game
First half
NZ 8/9
Second half
NZ 5/6

Thorne = 4/4
Collins = 3/3
Flavell = 2/3
Filipo = 2/2
Masoe = 2/2

Canada had 8 throws to their lineout, won 7 and lost 1 (stolen by Flavell). The All Blacks contested 4 of the 8 Canadian throws.

Scrums
A total of 15 in the game, with 4 resets
First half (8)
NZ 6/6
CA 1/2
Second half (8)
NZ 1/2
CA
12 Jun

You've gotta love it…
by Tracey Nelson
12 Jun 2007

Despite some vacuous wailings coming from certain media circles in the past few weeks, the Air New Zealand Cup provincial rugby competition is not in decline and a boring spectacle, but is alive and kicking. Kicking some serious butt, in actual fact.

Last year saw the launch of the Air New Zealand Cup competition, with the previous NPC revamped from three divisions into just two – ostensibly to distinguish between the professional and amateur levels of the game in our provinces. Fourteen teams now make up the Premier Division, with Hawkes Bay, Counties-Manukau, Manawatu, and Tasman (the amalgamation of Marlborough and Nelson Bays) coming up from Division Two to join the established Division One sides.

In 2006, Manawatu and Tasman certainly struggled with the step up to the Premier Division and despite some brave performances finished at the bottom of the ladder, Manawatu only managing a draw as their best result. Hawkes Bay and Counties-Manakau also battled to be competitive against the bigger guns in their first year back at the top level for some time. The doomsayers shook their heads and predicted that these teams would continue to struggle, and really what was the point in them trying to compete with the Super unions because the gap was too big. It was never going to work.

However, in the space of just one year the worm has well and truly turned and the big guys are being taught a lesson or two in how the game is played out in the provinces. This has been a timely reminder for some top professional players that rugby is not a game for Nancy Boys, and you do have to get your jersey dirty from time to time. Yes, we may not be seeing the sweeping try movements we’re used to on the firm, late summer ground we have in the Super 14, but the ANZC games are no less of a spectacle in my opinion. Given the wet, wintery conditions in many of the games to date, there have been some exceptional performances and honest endeavour to play fifteen man rugby. Good old fashioned rugby at that, you might say.

Hawkes Bay have proven to be giant slayers, first winning a slug-fest against last year’s semi-finalist Wellington in the rain and mud at Blue Chip Stadium (and teaching them a thing or two about scrummaging on the way), then two weeks later producing another home win against Ranfurly Shield holders North Harbour. Tasman managed to topple Hawkes Bay in Blenheim between times, showing the visitors that you can’t assume you’ll win a game on the back of your last performance.

Manawatu topped things off in Round 4 by recording a famous victory at FMG Stadium in Palmerston North – beating Bay of Plenty in their first Premier Divison win for 19 years. And not just by a point or two, but beating them comprehensively with some tremendous backline moves to score four tries and come away with maximum points from the game. This was just reward for a side that has toiled tirelessly without result, yet has a loyal fan base that turn out every game despite the lack of wins.

Barely into the second year of the new provincial competition, suddenly we’re not seeing teams going into games against the minnows confident of coming away with a win. They are having to work hard to score points and in some cases are lucky to come out with the win. Despite Auckland and Canterbury heading the points table, I’m not sure that anyone thought Hawkes Bay would be sitting in third place behind them. Nor that the likes of Northland and Tasman would be in the top half of the table while Wellington, North Harbour and Otago are sitting forlornly below.

There is a new excitement pumping in the veins of the forgotten provinces, the unions who have had to fight hard to keep their heads above the financial waterline as the game went professional with the added crisis of urban drift decimating their rugby playing populations. But they’re back, and although it’s a gradual strengthening it’s a strengthening nonetheless. It’s great to see the familiar face of provincial rugby again, and how refreshing it is to see some traditional props, guys who look like they ate the entire menu at KFC but who can scrummage till the cows come home. Likewise it’s nice to know there are still some skinny chaps that can run like whippets playing out on the wings. As one mate quipped recently – even better than watching is listening to the local radio commentators giving their version of what’s going on. Plenty of Kiwi accents and parochialism, mixed with decidedly non-PC comment.

So by all means try and tell the folk in Napier, Blenheim, Palmerston North and any of our other provincial centres that the ANZC is boring, and nobody is interested in it. I dare say that like their rugby teams, they would be more than capable of taking you on in that argument and coming out on top.

[In the picture above the representatives of the four new teams are: Tasman's Nathan George, Counties Manukau's Ben Meyer, Manawatu's Josh Bradnock and Hawke's Bay's Mutu Ngarimu.]

10 Jun

All Blacks v France, Wellington, 9 June 2007
by Tracey Nelson
10 Jun 2007

The usual analysis of the All Blacks’ game, being the First 3 to the Breakdown, tackle stats, penalties conceded, turnovers, the lineouts, and scrums.

Please note Completed Tackles means that player actually brought the ball carrier to ground (ie. snuffing out the movement), not assists in the tackle situation which are tallied separately. Missed tackles also includes slipped tackles where the ball runner gets away. Most importantly, I do NOT call a slipped tackle a tackle, it gets noted as a missed tackle.

Numbers in brackets are the first half/second half breakdown for each total. An asterisk denotes a player that came on as a substitute.

Team: MacDonald, Rokocoko, Toeava, McAlister, Sivivatu, Evans, Kelleher, So’oialo (vc), McCaw (c), Collins , Williams, Jack, Hayman, Oliver, Woodcock. Res – Howlett, Nonu, Leonard, Masoe, Flavell, Tialata, Mealamu.

Williams played for 28 minutes before leaving the field with a broken jaw, replaced by Flavell. Kelleher was replaced by Leonard after 49 minutes, McCaw, Woodcock and MacDonald were replaced by Masoe, Tialata and Howlett after 59 minutes, Oliver was replaced by Mealamu after 61 minutes, Nonu came on at the 66 minute mark.

Point Scoring
NZ 61 9 tries, 5 conversions, 2 penalties
France 10 1 try, 1 conversion, 1 penalty
Penalties/Free Kicks conceded
15 penalties and 1 free kick in the game
NZ 9 penalties and 1 free kick
France 6 penalties

NZ’s penalty offences:
Tackle = 4 (Williams, Woodcock, Flavell, Flavell)
Offside = 2 (Sivivatu, Collins)
Lineout (taking player in air) = 1 (Jack)
Obstruction = 1 (Sivivatu)
Ruck/Maul = 1 (Hayman)

1 Free kick awarded against NZ for too many players in lineout.

France’s penalty offences:
Offside (general) = 1
Tackle (offisde) = 3
Tackle (holding on) = 1
Scrum (binding) = 1

Turnovers conceded by NZ
NZ 12 (11 knock-ons, 1 in tackle)
First 3 to Breakdown
Hayman 45 (23+22)
Jack 27 (14+13)
McCaw 26 (18+8)
Flavell* 17 (5+12)
Oliver 17 (11+6)
Woodcock 15 (12+3)
Collins 13 (7+6)
So’oialo 13 (6+7)
McAlister 10 (7+3)
MacDonald 9 (7+2)
Masoe* 8
Williams 7
Evans 5 (4+1)
Rokocoko 5 (3+2)
Tialata* 4
Nonu* 3
Mealamu* 3
Kelleher 3 (2+1)
Toeava 3 (2+1)
Leonard* 1
Completed Tackles (72) and Assists (24)
McCaw 11 (7+4) and 1 (1+0)
Collins 10 (7+3) and 1 (0+1)
Hayman 6 (2+4) and 5 (4+1)
Oliver 6 (6+0) and 0
Jack 6 (2+4) and 0
So’oialo 5 (3+2) and 0
Flavell* 4 (3+1) and 3 (0+3)
Evans 4 (3+1) and 3 (0+3)
Toeava 4 (2+2) and 0
McAlister 3 (1+2) and 5 (2+3)
Kelleher 3 (3+0) and 1 (1+0)
Sivivatu 3 (1+2) and 1 (0+1)
Woodcock 2 (1+1) and 4 (4+0)
Rokocoko 1 (1+0) and 0
Masoe* 2 and 0
Leonard* 1 and 0
Missed and slipped tackles (7)
Rokocoko 2
Toeava 2
Woodcock 1
Collins 1
McAlister 1
NZ Lineouts
A total of 9 in the game
First half
NZ 3/4
Second half
NZ 4/5

Jack = 3/4
Williams = 1/2
So’oialo = 2/2
Tialata (quick throw) = 1/1

France had 18 throws to their lineout, won 16 and lost two (one knock-on and one stolen by Jack). The All Blacks only contested 5 of the French throws.

Scrums
A total of 15 in the game, with 6 resets
First half (7)
NZ 5/5
FR 2/2
Second half (8)
NZ 5/5
FR 1/3
3 Jun

All Blacks v France, Eden Park, 2 June 2007
by Tracey Nelson
3 Jun 2007

The usual basic breakdown of the All Blacks’ game, being the First 3 to the Breakdown, tackle stats, penalties conceded, turnovers, the lineouts, and scrums.

Please note Completed Tackles means that player actually brought the ball carrier to ground (ie. snuffing out the movement), not assists in the tackle situation which are tallieed separately. Missed tackles also includes slipped tackles where the ball runner gets away. Most importantly, I do NOT call a slipped tackle a tackle, it gets noted as a missed tackle.

Numbers in brackets are the first half/second half breakdown for each total. An asterisk denotes a player that came on as a substitute.

Team: MacDonald, Rokocoko, Toeava, Mauger, Sivivatu, Carter, Weepu, Masoe, McCaw (c), Thorne (vc), Williams, Jack, Hayman, Mealamu, Woodcock. Res – Nonu, Evans, Leonard, So’oialo, Flavell, Tialata, Hore.

Please note that McCaw, Carter, So’oialo and Evans all played 40 minutes each. Leonard and Hore subbed on at the 63 minute mark, the remainder of the bench came on at various times after the 70 minute mark.

Point Scoring
NZ 42 5 tries, 4 conversions, 3 penalties
France 11 1 try, 2 penalties
Penalties/Free Kicks conceded
14 penalties and 3 free kicks in the game
NZ 5 penalties
France 11 penalties and 3 free kicks

NZ’s penalty offences:
Tackle = 2 (Thorne, Williams)
Scrum = 2 (Woodcock, Thorne)
Double movement = 1 (Sivivatu)

France’s penalty offences:
Offside (general) = 3 (plus a yellow card)
Offside Ruck/Maul = 1
Offside Lineout = 1
Offside Tackle = 1
Scrum =2
Ruck/Maul = 2
Free kicks:
Lineout =2
Scrum =1

Turnovers conceded by NZ
NZ 21 (18 knock-ons, 3 in tackle)
First 3 to Breakdown
Thorne 35 (17+18)
Hayman 29 (18+11)
Williams 21 (10+11)
Woodcock 20 (12+8)
Jack 20 (9+11)
Masoe 20 (9+11)
McCaw 14
Mealamu 14 (7+7)
MacDonald 13 (7+6)
Mauger 12 (3+9)
So’oialo* 11
Toeava 11 (3+8)
Rokocoko 8 (5+3)
Evans* 7
Flavell* 6
Mauger 6 (4+2)
Carter 3
Tialata* 3
Leonard* 2
Nonu* 2
Weepu 2
Completed Tackles (48) and Assists (13)
Masoe 7 (2+5) and 2 (1+1)
Jack 6 (2+4) and 0
McCaw 5 and 1
Thorne 4 (2+2) and 2 (1+1)
Williams 3 (1+2) and 1 (1+0)
Toeava 3 (3+0) and 0
Weepu 3 (2+1) and 0
Hayman 3 (1+2) and 0
So’oialo* 2 and 3
Hayman 3 (2+1) and 0
Woodcock 2 (2+0) and 0
Sivivatu 2 (1+2) and 0
Rokocoko 2 (0+2) and 0
Evans* 2 and 0
Mealamu 1 (1+0) and 1 (1+0)
Mauger 1 (0+1) and 1 (0+1)
Hore* 1 and 0
Tialata* 0 and 1
Leonard* 0 and 1
Missed and slipped tackles (2)
Thorne 1
Carter 1
NZ Lineouts
A total of 17 in the game
First half
NZ 4/7
Second half
NZ 8/10

Jack = 5/6
Williams = 3/5
So’oialo = 1/2
Thorne = 1/1
Flavell = 1/1
Masoe = 1/1 (but called Not Straight)
Mauger 1/1 (quick throw by So’oialo)

Scrums
A total of 27 awarded, with 15 resets
First half (16)
NZ 9/11
FR 5/5
Second half (11)
NZ 5/5
FR 5/6