19 Aug

Game Stats: All Blacks v Springboks, Capetown, 16 August 2008
by Tracey Nelson
19 Aug 2008

This test match against South Africa and New Zealand marked Percy Montgomery’s 100th test appearance for the Springboks, making him the only player to do so for his country and just the ninth player overall in world rugby. It was the first time an All Black side has ever kept the Springboks scoreless in a test match played in South Africa.

The usual analysis of the All Blacks game, being the First 3 to the Breakdown, tackle stats, penalties conceded, turnovers, the lineouts, and scrums.

Some notes on these stats:

First Three to the Breakdown stats are looking for those players who are getting to the tackle/breakdown quickly and are also being useful by either cleaning out opposition players or setting up ruck ball. Anyone arriving and just leaning on the ruck isn’t included, so there are times when I will only tally one or two players. Likewise, if four players arrive simultaneously and perform a clean-out and setting up of a ruck, I will include all four in the stat.

Completed Tackles means that player actually brought the ball carrier to ground (ie. as the Laws of the Game actually described the tackler), not assists in the tackle situation which are tallied separately.

Missed tackles also includes slipped tackles where the ball runner gets away. Most importantly, I do NOT included slipped tackles in the Tackles Made stats, it gets noted as a missed tackle. Either you’re nailing the ball carrier or you’ve stuffed it up!

Numbers in brackets are the first half/second half breakdown for each total. An asterisk denotes a player that came on as a substitute. This week: Toeava for Sivivatu (injury) at 24 min,Afoafor Somerville at 48 min, Weepu for Cowan at 52 min, Mealamu for Hore at 60min, Boric for Thorn at 75 min, Donald for Carter at 78 min and Thomson for Kaino at 78 min.

Team: Muliaina, Sivivatu, Smith Nonu, Kahui,, Carter, Cowan, So’oialo, Kaino, McCaw (c), Williams, Thorn, Somerville, Hore, Woodcock
Reserves: Toeava, Donald, Weepu, Thomson, Boric, Afoa, Mealam

Points Scored NZ SA
Tries 3 Smith, Carter, Mealamu 0
Conversions 2 0
Penalties 0 0
Total 19 0

Penalties/Free Kicks Conceded Pen FKs
NZ 4 7
SA 10 8
Total 14 15

NZ Penalty Offences
Taking player without ball McCaw 1
Shoulder charge Cowan 1
Obstruction Thorn 1
Taking opposition arm in lineout Williams 1
Total   4

NZ Free Kick Offences
Tackle 6
Ruck 1
Total 7

SA Penalty Offences
Offside 4
Obstruction 1
Going off feet in tackle 3
Playing ball on ground 1
Scrum 1
Total 10

SA Free Kick Offences
Tackle 7
Lineout 1
Total 8

Turnovers Conceded by NZ
Knock-ons 5
Breakdown 3
Total 8

Turnovers Conceded by SA
Knock-ons 9
Forward pass 1
Spilled 3
Breakdown 5
Total 18

First 3 to Breakdown Total Per half
Thorn 37 20+17
McCaw 32 14+18
Hore 28 20+8
Williams 28 11+17
So’oialo 22 11+11
Somerville 19 13+6
Woodcock 17 6+11
Muliaina 16 4+12
Kaino 13 5+8
Nonu 13 6+7
Carter 12 4+8
Kahui 10 5+5
Afoa* 9  
Toeava* 8 2+6
Smith 7 5+2
Mealamu* 4  
Cowan 3 3+0
Sivivatu 3  
Boric* 2  
Thomson* 2  
Weepu 1  

Ball Carries
So’oialo 10
Kaino 9
McCaw 7
Woodcock 7
Afoa* 4
Thorn 4
Williams 3
Hore 3
Mealamu* 2
Somerville 1
Thomson 1
Total 51

Completed Tackles and Assists Tackles Assists
McCaw 14 (10+4) 3 (1+2)
Carter 11 (6+5) 1 (0+1)
So’oialo 9 (6+3) 1 (1+0)
Smith 8 (7+1) 1 (0+1)
Kahui 8 (6+2) 0
Thorn 6 (5+1) 0
Kaino 6 (4+2) 3 (1+2)
Woodcock 5 (4+1) 2 (1+1)
Somerville 4 (3+1) 0
Nonu 4 (2+3) 0
Williams 3 (2+1) 0
Cowan 3 (2+1) 0
Toeava* 3 (1+2) 1 (0+1)
Hore 2 (1+1) 1 (0+1)
Muliaina 2 (2+0) 1 (1+0)
Sivivatu 1 0
Mealamu* 1 0
Boric* 1 0
Weepu* 1 0
Total 92 14

Missed and Slipped Tackles
Somerville 2
Thorn 2
Woodcock 1
Williams 1
So’oialo 1
Cowan 1
Nonu 1
Sivivatu 1
Muliaina 1
Kahui 1
Afoa* 1
Total 13

NZ Line-outs Won From
First half 3 4
Second half 4 5
Total 7 9

NZ Line-out Jumpers Won From
McCaw 3 3
Williams 2 3
Kaino 2 2
Thorn 0 1

SA Line-outs Won From
First half 4 5
Second half 4 5
Total 8 10

NZ Scrums Won From
First half 9 9
Second half 6 6
Total 15 15

SA Scrums Won From
First half 5 5
Second half 6 6
Total 11 11

17 Aug

All Blacks Win In A Breeze
by Paul Waite
17 Aug 2008

The swirling winds of Newlands, Capetown swatted three Dan Carter penalty kicks plus a conversion wide of the uprights denying the All Blacks 14 points, but a gutsy all-round performance still got them an historic 19-0 victory over their old foes the Springboks on their own turf.

It was a good result, but it was a very frustrating test to watch. The All Blacks were guilty of slipping backwards in several areas, and this was compounded by Carter failing to nail a conversion followed by three penalty kicks which looked to be meat and drink to the normally World-class place-kicker.

However when Percy Montgomery, playing in his 100th test, also missed a couple of penalties from the same position it became obvious that the culprit was probably the swirling Newlands breeze, which is fairly notorious. It may have been a lack of confidence engendered by the previous three attempts, but a second half shot that Carter took didn’t even have the distance, so it seems that he wasn’t connecting with the ball that well as he usually does.

The All Blacks struck early, scoring a try in the 7th minute when Richie McCaw scooped up a slightly wild wide pass from Cowan from a ruck and out to the left, and then put in a perfectly weighted grubber behind the Bok defence, which the ever vigilant Conrad Smith swooped into the corner and skilfully forced with his forearm just before Butch James could cover.

With the conversion missed, the All Blacks then remained stuck on 5-0 for what seemed like a lifetime of test matches. Penalty shots came, were missed and then went with no change on the scoreboard. Springbok skipper Victor Matfield became as angry and petulant as a pouty 2.08m schoolboy with the referee over his rulings at the breakdown, where the South Africans were constantly playing the ball on the ground, and coming in from the side. At one point he told Goddard he was only refereeing one team which, unsurprisingly, failed to change the referee’s mind. In the parallel universe our Matfield thinks he lives in:

Victor: "Kak! you is only refereeing one team here, poephol!"
Goddard (after pause to think): "By Jove, I do believe you are right Victor, I’ll fix that up right away!"

Matfield would have been better off advising his players to play to the Laws of the game, but that course of action didn’t seem to occur to him, much to the detriment of the Springbok effort, and the advantage of the All Blacks.

With the missed penalties the All Blacks lost 14 points, and the game remained a tightly contested affair until late. The pace of the first half saw enough rugby played at stupendous pace to fill a full 80 minutes of a normal Northern Hemisphere 6N test. This came at a cost, and the pace noticeably fell off in the second spell, and particularly in the final quarter.

Putting the final result to one side for a moment, the All Blacks failed to achieve Richie McCaw’s avowed aims prior to the game, that they should keep to the standard of the Eden Park victory over Australia. In particular they failed to put pressure on their kicks, the defence was guilty of standing off too much, and support at the breakdown was somewhat patchy and disorganised, admittedly without being quite as bad as it has been.

With the kicking, every kick we sent to the Boks saw the receiver enjoying all of the time and space they needed to either return it, pass or run into support. Conversely, with the kicks the All Blacks got, the receiver was getting ball and then the man just a second or two after, which is the way it should be.

Apart from on the goal-line, the defence was also slightly below par. The All Blacks tended to stand off too much and failed to force the issue. As a result they let the Boks run through them too much, and a more patient effort from them would have seen one or two tries come from those opportunities. In the second half things improved, but a lot of that was due to the energy of the game ebbing, due to the pace of the first 40 minutes. Luckily for the All Blacks the Boks were playing in the mode of pushing the pass too far, and kept losing control of the ball at critical moments. But on another day New Zealand would have been punished for their sins.

At the ruck support was for the most part reasonable. It certainly wasn’t the worst performance from the All Blacks in this department, but it wasn’t superb either. There was a distinct impression of them being a bit light in numbers on occasion, and some structure and momentum was lost as a result.

Carter also attempted two poor drop-goal shots. The execution was sub-standard, given the knowledge that the Boks were always going to be up on him like a rash. He didn’t stand deep enough, took too much time, and got charged down twice. The All Blacks were darned lucky not to concede a try from one of those.

Finally, Jimmy Cowan and Brad Thorn deserve a special mention, and both of them should share a DoM (Dickhead of the Match) award. First Cowan launched a blatant shoulder charge on a Springbok winger to send him out in touch right in front of Wayne "Yes That Joker" Barnes, who (this time) quite correctly came in and forced the issue with Goddard to give the penalty. Then shortly afterwards in another passage of play Thorn deliberately stepped across into the path of the Bok halfback and knocked him flat. That’s just absolute rubbish, and we don’t want All Blacks even thinking about it, never mind actually doing it. It cost the All Blacks two penalties (not converted, as it happened) and it was just shite. I hope Henry has "a word in their ears" because it isn’t bloody good enough.

Despite his off day kicking from tee, Dan Carter came through for the All Blacks and nailed the test late in the second half with a wonderful piece of magic to step and slip through under the posts, and then dab the ball to ground behind him over his head, while on his back. It was just the kind of mercurial rugby that was needed to bust what was a very strong Bok defensive effort, as always, and it essentially put the test match to bed as far as the result was concerned.

Whilst 19-0 is a very satisfying final scoreline, it was blown out by a 7-pointer which came from a mixture of desperation and brain-explosion by the Boks in their own 22m, where they effectively tried some miracle passes and Mealamu ended up intercepting and going over. A more fitting score would have therefore been 12-0, but we here in New Zealand won’t complain too loudly, especially after that jammy get-out-of-jail win the Boks blagged off us in Dunedin!

So well done to the All Blacks on a great win. It doesn’t come any harder than playing away on South African soil in the cauldron of Newlands, and especially when one of their own in the form of Percy Montgomery is playing in his 100th test match. To win the test to Nil is even more of an achievement.

Finally congratulations to Percy. We might have laughed hard at the hairdo on past occasions, and loved seeing him struggle under a garryowen coming down with ice on it, but he’s been a great player to watch over the years, has some lovely skills running and kicking the ball, and congratulations to him for that achievement.

The All Blacks now have the challenge of vegetating for three weeks whilst the South Africans host the Wallabies for two consequetive tests at home. We will see how they emerge from that lay-off to go to Brisbane and try to nail the Bledisloe Cup for 2008.

Paul Waite

Paul Waite

Haka editor-in-chief. Please do not feed.

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15 Aug

Captain Fantastic
by Tracey Nelson
15 Aug 2008

You’ll often hear the words in this day and age that no-one is indispensable, that one man can’t win a game on his own, one man can’t make a difference. Of course, those people probably haven’t seen the All Blacks play without one Richie McCaw.

So come on, hands up those who think the All Blacks are capable of playing as well as they did at Eden Park two weeks ago without Richie McCaw on the field? Seriously. Because despite having a first five with the many skills of Dan Carter, games are still won up front and main battle you must win in the modern game is that of the breakdown.

While McCaw was out injured, the All Blacks struggled to find a replacement at openside. They tried playing left-right flankers, with mixed results (a win and then a close loss to South Africa) before using the specialist Daniel Braid against Australia in Sydney. To give Braid his due he did his job in arriving at the breakdown, but the All Blacks’efforts were hamstrung by simply not having enough players in support of his efforts. Against South Africa in Dunedin a similar scenario had played out, where So’oialo and Thomson were beaten in the loose.

In their attempts to play a fast, wide game in Sydney the All Blacks sacrificed numbers and accuracy for speed and risky offloads. Australia, with loose forwards of the calibre of George Smith and Rocky Elsom, simply nullified that strategy by contesting at the breakdown with more numbers and counter rucking to put the All Blacks on the back foot. It also didn’t help that our lineout had one of those now familiar attack of the staggers, with the Wallabies able to use their kicking game, put the ball into touch and compete on our throw to win the ball back.

Add to that some head-scratching subsitutions, notably that of Sione Lauaki for Braid early on in the second half, and suddenly the All Blacks were fielding what was essentially three No 8s against a very mobile, balanced Aussie loose trio. Smith and Elsom had a field day in the loose, the introduction of Keven Mealamu just further added to the All Blacks’ lineout meltdown, and the entire team had a night of handling errors they’d rather forget.

Fast forward to Auckland. After a bizarre week of admissions from the coaching staff that they had been “out-coached”, that they were “struggling” with the ELVs, that we had tried to play from behind the gain line too often, our kicking game had been poor, and we had run out of puff, the heat was really on. Cue the return of McCaw from injury.

Yes we had a better game plan in Auckland, we kicked for territory for starters and even put the ball into touch instead of trying to play force back without a second kicking option outside Carter. We contested on Australia’s lineouts, something the All Blacks have been much maligned for in the past. And lo and behold, contesting worked as we won 1/3 of Australia’s throws – albeit we had three pods jumping against their two, the Wallabies being short on jumpers minus the injured Elsom. But it wasn’t just winning some of Australia’s lineouts or playing in their half of the field that won the game.

Watching that test match from the stands at Eden Park you were struck time and again by the sheer amount of work that McCaw gets through in a game. It’s not just that turnover he wins, or the tackle he makes. It’s the fact that immediately afterwards he’s there for the next pass, or running in support. At times it seems simply incredible that he can be in so many places, but such is his reading of the game and running lines that it often seems as if there’s two of him on the field. Those fifty-fifty moments where the ball is on the ground or the opposition player is about to make the telling break or pass are the moments where McCaw comes into his own. His workrate both at the breakdown, in suppport and on defence making the tackle are where he stands head and shoulders above the rest.

To play the fast, off-loading style of game the All Blacks excell at, you need front foot ball. This is the difference McCaw makes, he hits the rucks fast and hard to secure our ball at the breakdown. His speed in support of the ball carrier gives the All Blacks the invaluable ability to recycle the ball quickly, denying the opposition the chance to slow it down and reorganise their defence. Take that away and suddenly the All Blacks look half the side as was so well demonstrated in Dunedin and Sydney. This week we have the mouthwatering chance to watch two of the finest flankers in world rugby in the form of McCaw and Schalk Burger go head to head as the All Blacks take on the Springboks in Capetown. The winner of this breakdown battle will go a long way to seeing his side win this all important match in the 2008 TriNations series.

4 Aug

Game Stats: All Blacks v Wallabies, Auckland, 2 August, 2008
by Tracey Nelson
4 Aug 2008

Despite a tendency for games under the ELVs to have more scrums than lineouts, this test match saw only 11 scrums set versus a staggering 35 lineout throws (11 to the All Blacks and 24 to the Wallabies) although one lineout never had the ball thrown in to it due to an awarding of a free kick to the All Blacks. Also of note was that both sides contested every lineout.

The usual analysis of the All Blacks game, being the First 3 to the Breakdown, tackle stats, penalties conceded, turnovers, the lineouts, and scrums.

Some notes on these stats:

First Three to the Breakdown stats are looking for those players who are getting to the tackle/breakdown quickly and are also being useful by either cleaning out opposition players or setting up ruck ball. Anyone arriving and just leaning on the ruck isn’t included, so there are times when I will only tally one or two players. Likewise, if four players arrive simultaneously and perform a clean-out and setting up of a ruck, I will include all four in the stat.

Completed Tackles means that player actually brought the ball carrier to ground (ie. as the Laws of the Game actually described the tackler), not assists in the tackle situation which are tallied separately.

Missed tackles also includes slipped tackles where the ball runner gets away. Most importantly, I do NOT included slipped tackles in the Tackles Made stats, it gets noted as a missed tackle. Either you’re nailing the ball carrier or you’ve stuffed it up!

Numbers in brackets are the first half/second half breakdown for each total. An asterisk denotes a player that came on as a substitute. This week: Mealamu for Hore at 56min, Aofa for Somerville at 58 min, Tuitavake for Smith at 68 min, Weepu for Cowan at 73 min, Thomson for Kaino and Donald for Kahui at 74 min, and Boric for Thorn at 78 min.

Team: Muliaina, Sivivatu, Smith Nonu, Kahui,, Carter, Cowan, So’oialo, Kaino, McCaw (c), Williams, Thorn, Somerville, Hore, Woodcock
Reserves: Tuitavake, Smith, Weepu, Thomson, Boric, Afoa, Mealam

Points Scored NZ Aus
Tries 4 1
Conversions 2 1
Penalties 5 1
Total 39 10

Overall NZ Aus
Possession 52% 48%
Territory 59% 41%

Penalties/Free Kicks Conceded Pen FKs
NZ 6 6
Aus 8 5
Total 14 11

NZ Penalty Offences
Tackle Williams, Kahui 2
Ruck offside So’oialo 2
Scrum wheel Woodcock 1
Tackle without ball Kaino 1
Total   6

NZ Free Kick Offences
Tackle 5
Lineout 1
Total 6

Aus Penalty Offences
Ruck offside 2
Tackle (high) 2
Tackle 1
Sealing off 1
Playing ball on ground 1
Total 8

Aus Free Kick Offences
Tackle 3
Ruck 2
Lineout 2
Total 7

Turnovers Conceded by NZ
Knock-ons 6
Breakdown 6
Spilled 2
Other 3
Total 17

Turnovers Conceded by Aus
Knock-ons 5
Breakdown 13
Lineouts 10
Total 28

First 3 to Breakdown Total Per half
McCaw 43 19+24
Hore 29 17+12
Thorn 24 14+10
So’oialo 22 9+13
Somerville 21 14+7
Woodcock 16 11+5
Kaino 15 7+8
Williams 13 7+6
Smith 10 3+7
Nonu 9 5+4
Carter 6 3+3
Afoa* 5  
Muliaina 5 2+3
Sivivatu 5 2+3
Kahui 4 3+1
Mealamu* 3  
Tuitavake* 2  
Boric* 2  
Thomson* 2  
Cowan* 2 (1+1)

Ball Carries
Williams 11
Woodcock 5
Thorn 5
So’oialo 5
Hore 4
McCaw 4
Kaino 1
Somerville 1
Afoa* 1
Mealamu* 1
Total 39

Completed Tackles and Assists Tackles Assists
McCaw 13 (5+8) 3 (2+1)
Thorn 10 (3+7) 5 (3+2)
Carter 9 (3+7) 3 (2+1)
So’oialo 8 (2+6) 5 (3+2)
Williams 8 (0+8) 0
Smith 8 (3+5) 0
Woodcock 7 (5+2) 3 (1+2)
Kaino 7 (3+4) 2 (2+0)
Nonu 6 (3+3) 2 (1+1)
Mealamu* 5 0
Hore 4 (3+1) 2 (1+1)
Somerville 4 (2+2) 1 (0+1)
Thomson* 3 1
Tuitavake* 3 1
Cowan 3 (2+1) 0
Afoa* 2 0
Sivivatu 2 (1+1) 0
Kahui 1 (0+1) 0
Muliaina 1 (0+1) 0
Weepu* 1 0
Total 105 29

Missed and Slipped Tackles
Kaino 2
So’oialo 2
Carter 2
Nonu 2
Sivivatu 2
Woodcock 1
Hore 1
Somerville 1
Thorn 1
Williams 1
Cowan 1
Smith 1
Total 17

NZ Line-outs Won From
First half 8 8
Second half 2 3
Total 10 11

NZ Line-out Jumpers Won From
Williams 4 4
Thorn 2 2
Kaino 1 1
So’oialo 1 1
Cowan 1 1

Aus Line-outs Won From
First half 5 8
Second half 9 16
Total 14 24

NZ Scrums Won From
First half 4 4
Second half 5 5
Total 9 9

Aus Scrums Won From
First half 0 0
Second half 2 2
Total 2 2

3 Aug

Back to Basics
by Paul Waite
3 Aug 2008

All the previous week’s talk about how Robbie had out-coached Henry and his two assistants was put into perspective where it counts, out on the field of Eden Park, where the All Blacks proved that when they play a committed eighty minutes respecting the basics of the game, they are a tough proposition for any team in the World.

Last week the All Blacks, coaches perhaps included, hoodwinked themselves into thinking that the Australians, coached by the Kiwi Wunderkind, Robbie ‘Dingo’ Deans, were something special. Whether unconsciously or no, they paid them too much respect. The were guilty of standing off, watching them with doubt as to their own ability and they paid the price. In short the All Blacks provided the Wallabies with the perfect platform to flaunt their many talents instead of simply getting stuck in and nullifying them before imposing their own.

This week the All Blacks delivered the message that things were going to be very different by performing a fierce rendition of Kapa O Pango as the haka. From the whistle the defence was back to a mean, punishing unit which apart from one slip-up which gave the ever dangerous Mortlock his break to create a fine Wallaby try, let nothing else past and eventually smashed the Wallaby resolve and saw the team wearing yellow resorting to hail-mary passes out wide which went straight into touch, and squandering possession by kicking in the vain hope that a lone Australian wing might somehow get the ball before three All Blacks covering it. In short the Wallaby attack was crushed and humbled.

Elsewhere in the game the signs were all good. The lineout was, for once, secure, and the scrum, as ever, dominant. Last week the All Blacks failed to get numbers to the breakdown and in support of the ball-carrier. This week, with the return of Richie McCaw leading the charge that area of weakness in the New Zealand game was eradicated. The injection of Cowan for the dithery Ellis was a refreshing addition to the mix, and the doughty Southlander delivered crisp ball off the deck all game, varying it with some clever pop kicks to keep the Aussies guessing. The added space the fast delivery gave the receivers made all the difference. Cowan is now clearly the number one halfback in the squad.

But one of the chief reasons for the emphatic 39-10 scoreline (which amongst the technorati of rugby officionados is usually referred to as ‘a dorking‘) was the crunching nature of the defence. The All Blacks piled into the Wallabies taking no prisoners, and there would have been some battered and bruised players winging their way back across the Tasman today in the aftermath.

Last week the Wallabies played well, and took advantage of an All Black team which for one reason or another allowed themselves to forget the basics of defence, territorial kicking, support at the breakdown, and building their gameplan from a platform provided by a structured forward effort. Instead they played helter-skelter rugby, utterly lacking any composure or structure. This week the Wallabies played no differently, but faced an All Black team with a steely glint in its eye, and a fierce determination in its heart. One week can indeed be a very long time in rugby. One would hope that both the coaches and players have learned the lesson that the basics of the game must always be respected at the highest level, or else they will suffer the very same consequences that we witnessed last week.

The Man Of The Match, as far as we at Haka are concerned, was Tony Woodcock. Not only did he out-scrum his Aussie opposite, but he also drove over for two well-taken and well-timed tries. If his first, after around 20 minutes didn’t quite set the tone for the rest of the test, then his second low drive over three minutes later definitely did. It rewarded the All Blacks for some fierce pressure on the Wallaby line, and acted as a spur which saw them leading 21-10 at half-time. Not even a beautifully taken try care of a worked move from a lineout, and a Mortlock bust past the despairing tackle of Conrad Smith was enough to deflect the momentum being built up by the men in black.

Ma’a Nonu also chimed in with a brace of tries, the crucial first of which came with the second half only three minutes old. The All Blacks contested a Wallaby lineout, scrambled the ball out to the backs where Sivivatu combined to put Nonu over on the burst. A Carter conversion and two further penalties, backed up by consistent All Black pressure on the Wallabies put the game to bed at 34-10. A try in the dying minutes care of a long-range Nonu burst down the left touch-line saw the final score of 39-10 reached, together with a bonus point which might become important in the tightest 3N competition for years.

Starring performances for the All Blacks were returning skipper Richie McCaw, half-back Jimmy Cowan for his combativeness and quick delivery, Woodcock for his crucial and well-taken brace of tries, Richard Kahui for containing Lote Tuquiri on the wing, Mils Muliaina for his command of the ball in the air at the back, and Ali Williams for his line-out performance.

But this test was won by the team, and because it respected the basics of the game and played it with the kind of steely-eyed precision and commitment for which the All Blacks are rightly reknowned.

We trust that the team and coaches will pack that combination with the luggage they take to South Africa.

Paul Waite

Paul Waite

Haka editor-in-chief. Please do not feed.

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